The PR Power of YouTube

For those YouTubers who’ve figured out their approach to success on that platform, they create content in touch with their groups, often more than one “genre.” It could be toys, video gaming, health and fitness, or pop culture. Some of them have established very large followings, which gives them some PR power and pull. Many of these YouTubers are even writing books in print format and seeing relatively good sales considering printed book sales have been steadily declining over the last several years.

Who are some of the giants of YouTube? Here’s a few you might be interested in learning who they are and how their PR efforts work for them. When working with companies and others, they fall in the “influencer” category.

Youtube PR: The Fine Brothers
Fine Brothers YouTube PR

The Fine Brothers and their REACT channel fall in the pop culture category. Now both in their 30’s, they began their business and creating online content in 2004. But they have said they’ve been creating video in one form or another since they were children. Their business, Fine Brothers Entertainment, is a full-service production company creating feature films, television shows, and digital series … as well as their shorter videos features on YouTube and elsewhere.

Their main YouTube channel (TheFineBros) has had as many as 14 million subscribers and their videos have had more than 4 billion views in total. They have two additional channels on YouTube, TheFineBros2, and React. The React channel shows content that they’ve become famous for – short interview-type films where they use a topic to ask people of a group for their reactions. One popular example of this series is “Kids React to Viral Videos.”

Their efforts have paid off nicely for their ventures, but they’ve also collaborated with other producers, been involved with television productions related to their React-type of content, and been strong advocates for fair treatment of other producers and creators. They are involved in lots outside of YouTube, but the platform remains a key element of their success.

Youtube PR: Jenna Mourey – aka Jenna Marbles
Jenna Marbles Youtube PR

With over 16 million subscribers to her YouTube channel, she’s earned her place on this list. She’s been YouTubing for years with her first big video in 2010 titled “How to Trick People Into Thinking You’re Good Looking.” That video got over 5.3 million views in just the first week after its release. She’s had more than 1.7 billion views of her videos so far. In the overall stats, she’s the seventh most subscribed to channel and the top one operated by a woman.

Her videos are generally about current topics and issues focused on women and their concerns. Her videos have been featured on ABC News and the New York Times. Other ventures she’s got her hands in … making dog toys and collaborating with other YouTubers. She makes approximately $4 million from YouTube annually.

Youtube PR: Zoe Sugg – aka Zoella

Zoella Youtube PR

Zoe started posting YouTube videos from her room when she was just 18. In those days she posed mainly about décor ideas, beauty tips, “haul” videos and such. She worked at an interior design firm at that time. She’s from England and has been successful enough with her ventures to be able to buy a London penthouse costing £1 million. In addition to the stuff she does, because it interests her, she has paid endorsement deals.

Zoe debuted her book “Girl Online” in 2014. Upon release, she became the U.K.’s fastest-selling debut novelist. Zoe has approximately 10 million subscribers on her primary YouTube channel –Zoella, but she also has another channel called MoreZoella with approximately 3.5 million subscribers.
Like any other kind of success, YouTubers have learned what their target market wants and used it to move forward. They’ve learned, each in their own way, the art of PR.

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